Ilma from MailerLite

Ilma5 min readBehind the ScenesOctober 18, 2017

Why should you care about your company’s culture?

Why should you care about your company’s culture?

Meet our developer Arunas. Last fall he decided he needed to recharge. Arunas took 4 weeks vacation to walk 900 km in Camino de Santiago, Spain.

And here is his Facebook post after the walk:


Meet our designer Kristupas. Here is a quote from his Medium post:

“I’ll begin this story by first disclosing that I’ve always been a loner, preferred working on my own rather than with a group, had very few (but amazing) friends. This text will be about a company that understands that when you want to work alone – you don’t need to be forced to go and sit at the office and when you feel lonely – you are very welcome.”


This is Marcin, a guy that produces our videos and hosts webinars. He used to work with customer support. When Marcin revealed his super-power to create videos, we offered him to use it at MailerLite.

Now we have an in-house video guy that knows the product and our customer and is passionate about his job. Can’t ask for more.

MailerLite’s culture = freedom + responsibility

These are perfect examples to show MailerLite’s culture. We believe that freedom fosters responsibility. Therefore we make sure to support our MailerLite team at living, working and expressing themselves freely.

We can travel the world. Work from anywhere. Move and live in a city that suits our family. Go to the gym in the middle of the day. Work on our own schedule.

We initiate and lead projects. Anyone can pitch an idea or a project, and if his or her arguments are strong enough the person becomes the owner of the project, and then sees it through. That way anyone can try their hand at a different role and have the sense of ownership.

We strongly support passions. If you work in customer support and want to try your hand at videography if you are a developer and want to try your hand at design. Everyone has a fair chance to show their skills, and experience walking in another man’s shoes.

4 years ago we decided to write down our values, what we focus on and how we work (see the values here). That’s how we know that all the team is on the same page.

How does this affect MailerLite as a business?

A self-managed team does not need project managers, HR or management. If we see a need for additional help, we take care of the hiring process. If we see the need for a change at MailerLite, we pitch and lead the project. That’s how we’re able to compete with 25x bigger competitors (our competitors have several hundred or thousands of employees) – at the moment we have more than 370,000 customers all over the world.

Happy team means happy customers.

Virgin Airlines website says: “Happy staff are proud staff, and proud staff deliver excellent customer service, which drives business success.”

We are very proud to say that our 24/7 customer support response time is under 10 minutes. And MailerLite is proud to lead in customer satisfaction category among other email marketing companies. Our customer satisfaction is 97%.

Forbes says: “Customer feedback from 5,000 real-life users showed that MailerLite has the biggest customer satisfaction in email marketing category.”

If all happy customers recommend us to only one friend, we’ll grow at least twice. That’s not too bad, right?

What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger

It’s easy to brag about your awesome team and culture when everything is fine. But only in bad times do you get to know if that’s actually true.

Last week MailerLite faced major technical challenges. The whole team had to come together. Our developers were working long long hours. The support team had to deal with the highest number of tickets ever seen to us. So some colleagues from other projects joined them as well. It was amazing to watch how the team mobilized to help customers. We all have good times and bad times. And it’s super important to know that you can trust your team.

Now all the issues have been solved. We’ve learned a lot. We’ve changed our work processes. And I think we’ve become a stronger team.

Here’s what our colleagues wrote in 15Five this week: